how do you mitigate radon

RADON MITIGATION

When you're dealing with a Radon reduction system, your choice in contractors does make a difference.  Not all Radon reduction systems are built the same.  At American Radon Services of Virginia LLC we use quality parts that are installed by certified technicians all backed by our 10-year warranty.

RADON TESTING

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RADON SERVICE

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We'll answer all your Radon related questions as well as provide you with all the necessary resources to keep you and your family safe.   American Radon Services of Virginia LLC is a certified Radon Measurement and Mitigator serving Virginia, Maryland and Washington D.C.

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American Radon Services of Virginia LLC provides service in the Virginia, Maryland and Washington D.C.  area.  Our after sales service is tops in the industry.  We service all radon fan models and offer affordable maintenance contracts that fit your budget.

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American Radon Services of Virginia LLC is a cerified Radon Measurement Specialist.  Everyone should have their home tested for Radon regardless of where you live.  Learn about all the possible Radon Tests and contact us to help you choose which testing method is best for you.

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Contact Information

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ABOUT RADON

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American Radon Services of VA LLC

8814 Dundee Dr.

​Fredericksburg, VA 22408

T. (540) 455-4961 

info@arsofva.com


Business Hours:

Monday - Saturday 8-5

Sunday - Closed

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​​​​About  Radon 

Radon is a naturally occurring, odorless, and colorless gas caused by the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock, and water.  Long-term exposure to elevated radon levels creates an increased risk of lung cancer.  The EPA recommends that radon levels in excess of 4.0 pCi/L be reduced below the current Compliance Level.

Since radon is a gas, it enters buildings and homes through cracks and openings in the walls and foundation.  Radon's primary hazard for people is caused by inhalation of the gas and its highly radioactive, heavy-metallic decay products (polonium, lead, and bismuth), which tend to collect on dust in the air. The problem arises when these elements stick to the delicate cells lining the passageways leading into the lungs.
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Radon is formed by the natural radioactive decay of uranium in rock, soil, and water.  Naturally existing, low levels of uranium occur widely in Earth's crust.  It can be found in all 50 states.  Once produced, radon moves through the ground to the air above.  Some remains below the surface and dissolves in water that collects and flows under the ground's surface.


Radon has a half-life of about four days—half of a given quantity of it breaks down every four days.  When radon undergoes radioactive decay, it emits ionizing radiation in the form of alpha particles. It also produces short-lived decay products, often called progeny or daughters, some of which are also radioactive.  Unlike radon, the progeny are not gases and can easily attach to dust and other particles.  Those particles can be transported by air and can also be breathed.  The decay of progeny continues until stable, non-radioactive progeny are formed. At each step in the decay process, radiation is released.


Sometimes, the term radon is used in a broad sense, referring to radon and its radioactive progeny all at once.  When radiation from radon is measured directly, the amount is usually expressed in picocuries per liter of air (pCi/L).Radon has been identified as the second leading cause of lung cancer in the United States (second only to smoking).


The EPA reports that radon causes approximately 21,000 lung cancer deaths every year in the United States.  Some scientific studies of radon exposure indicate that children may be more sensitive to radon than adults. This may be due to their higher respiration rate and their rapidly dividing body cells, which may be more vulnerable to radiation damage.  Every home should be tested for radon regardless of where the home is located, the age of the home, or foundation type.  It should be tested whether or not the home is in an area that is “prone to having radon problems.”  Homes with elevated radon levels have been found in practically every county in the United States of America. The EPA has established that if a home or building is found to have a radon level of 4 pCi/L or higher, action should be taken to reduce it.  In most cases, radon levels can be reduced to 2 pCi/L or lower with the installation of an active (fan-assisted) venting system.  Indoor radon is

judged to be the most serious environmental carcinogen that the general public is exposed to.